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Watching Brief – April 2016

Home Insights Watching Brief – April 2016

Matter of opinion

Reflections on the ongoing impact of the flag debate

The flag referendum has been criticised for failing to engage with the conversations most central to the debate – how do we view ourselves as a nation? What is the ongoing relevance of the Union flag? Is it time we became a republic? But this very failure, coupled with the timing of the new Governor-General’s appointment, has been the catalyst for deeper public interest in these issues. 

Capitalising on the appetite for a broader conversation in the wake of the referendum, Labour has suggested that a good time for considering becoming a republic will be (delicately put), “at the end of the reign of the current monarch”. John Key, in an explicit acknowledgement of the connection, says the next time the flag will be debated will be when New Zealand becomes a republic. The Greens have weighed in, questioning the current process for the selection of Governor-General.

However, discussion around the future of our nation cannot be limited to the republic / monarchy debate. It is inevitable that New Zealand will become a republic: the question is really a matter of when. The more critical discussion is about the need for a written constitution and what that would comprise. 

A move to a republic will require a written constitution in some form which determines how we choose our new head of state, among other things), but there are good arguments we should be considering a written constitution now, with or without a break from the monarchy. The Green’s focus on a more transparent process for the selection of a Governor-General misses the bigger question.

In this context, Sir Geoffrey Palmer’s speech in Nelson last weekend was timely and informative. He believes a written constitution for New Zealand is necessary, achievable, and could be comprehensively set out in 40 pages. He points out that we are one of only three modern democracies that are yet to have a written constitution (the others being the UK and Israel). 

The written constitution is the topic that matters, not only because it is inevitable, as it will come with a republic at some point, but because it is increasingly apparent our current unwritten ‘piecemeal’ constitution provides a weak and ineffective framework. A constitution should provide the fabric of a modern democracy, protecting core societal values and ensuring those in power are held to account. 

However, the constitution we have is easily unravelled, and once unravelled, very hard to reconstruct. While the current Government was elected in part for its more pragmatic approach, such an approach does not necessarily sit well with a constitution based largely on convention and practice. In addition, the public understanding of our constitution is limited given its ad hoc nature, and there is a corresponding limited understanding of when and why it is at risk.  

Of further and increasing concern, is the lack of protection offered by our New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 (NZBORA). The first declaration of inconsistency under NZBORA (after 25 years) was made in the case Taylor v AG in which the Court held that electoral legislation preventing prisoners from voting was incompatible with the right to vote. The case is currently under appeal, so the extent and nature of the Government’s response is not yet known. However, there is no requirement under our constitutional arrangements for the Government to respond at all.

The Constitutional Advisory Panel released a report in 2013 entitled ‘New Zealand’s Constitution: A report on a Conversation’. The Panel and report arose from National’s agreement with the Maori Party, and addressed the question of a written constitution at a relatively high level. It indentified that New Zealanders had a poor understanding of what our constitution comprised and noted there was an appetite for a constitution that was more accessible and understood, and people needed more information about options. The Panel report was not without value, however, its key recommendation: for New Zealand ‘to continue the conversation’ – one that could easily sink, without trace.

The flag referendum could be the impetus for the more detailed and significant conversation New Zealand needs to have. Indeed, perhaps we will look back on the referendum as more than a $26 million wasted cost or a bloody nose for John Key. It might one day be recognised as the beginning of a mature dialogue about New Zealand’s constitution, the one that leads to meaningful constitutional change. 

The challenge will be to find a way to enable the public to have a concrete rather than abstract understanding of what a written constitution might involve. Perhaps Sir Geoffrey Palmer’s 40 page example, written up, will be the right vehicle to take this important conversation forward, at the very least, by both informing and testing public views.


In the news

IMF to conduct Financial Sector Assessment Program of New Zealand

The Financial Markets Authority (FMA) has announced that the International Monetary Fund (IMF) will visit New Zealand to conduct a Financial Sector Assessment Program review (FSAP) later this year.

An FSAP is a comprehensive review of a country’s financial system, with the current review testing New Zealand’s prudential and securities regulations against international standards. As set out by the FMA in its terms of reference, the review will include:

  • a full assessment for the banking sector against the Basel Core Principles;
  • a full assessment of the insurance sector against the International Association of Insurance Supervisors’ Core Principles;
  • a partial assessment of securities regulation involving informal benchmarking against the International Organisation of Securities Commissions’ principles; and
  • a partial assessment of the financial market infrastructure involving informal benchmarking against the Committee on Payment Market Infrastructures’ principles.

The IMF will coordinate its review with the Reserve Bank on behalf of the New Zealand Council of Financial Regulators, a body which includes the FMA, Treasury and Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment. The review will be undertaken in two phases; in mid-August the IMF will review the banking and insurance sectors, while securities regulation will be considered in the first three weeks of November. 

In terms of securities regulation, the IMF cannot conduct a full detailed assessment with a rating at this stage (as typically occurs in an FSAP) as a number of market participants are yet to complete the licensing process associated with the new securities regime of the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013; it will instead provide a technical note on its findings.

The last FSAP was conducted in 2003, and since then there have been numerous changes to New Zealand’s system of financial regulation including the introduction of the Anti-Money Laundering and Countering Financing of Terrorism Act 2009, the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013, and the creation of the FMA in 2011 to oversee securities and financial markets conduct.

Once the FSAP is complete, the IMF will produce Detailed Assessment Reports with ratings for the banking and insurance sectors, and technical notes in relation to the securities regulation aspects of the review in early 2017. This feedback will enable the FMA to assess New Zealand’s progress since the last review, and will highlight areas for improvement. In anticipation of the FSAP, the FMA intends to consult with market participants about how the IMF will be conducting its review and how the industry can demonstrate best practice in New Zealand.

The FMA’s press release announcing the IMF’s FSAP can be read here. Terms of reference for the review can be found here.


Appointments to top spots: Governor-General and Chief Parliamentary Counsel

Dame Patsy Reddy will succeed Sir Jerry Mateparae to become the 21st Governor General of New Zealand. The Governor-General is the representative of the Sovereign in the Realm of New Zealand, and the office of Governor-General is, by convention, apolitical. Dame Patsy currently holds multiple governance roles, including Deputy Chair of the New Zealand Transport Agency, Chair of Education Payroll Ltd and independent director of Payments NZ Ltd and her five-year term will commence on 14 September 2016. A State farewell for Sir Jerry Mateparae is due to be held on 24 August.

Further, Fiona Leonard, the current Deputy Chief Parliamentary Counsel, will succeed David Noble to become Chief Parliamentary Counsel. Chief Parliamentary Counsel is the principal advisor and Chief Executive of the Parliamentary Council Office (PCO), and is responsible for ensuring the PCO provides high quality services and advice to the Government and Parliament regarding New Zealand legislation. Ms Leonard’s five-year term will commence on 7 May.


Auditor-General releases report on public sector management of financial assets

The Office of the Auditor-General released its report, ‘A review of public sector financial assets and how they are managed and governed’ earlier this month. The report discusses the increasing significance of the public sector’s ownership of financial assets (such as cash, deposits, shares, and derivatives), and uses a sample of 14 public entities from both central and local government to review how those assets are being managed and governed. The 14 public entities collectively hold nearly 65 percent of all financial assets in the public sector (the total value of the public sector’s financial assets is approximately $136 billion).

The report forecasts that the value and use of financial assets by the public sector will continue to increase, and, as this happens, challenges will emerge at a whole-of-government level.

The report makes three recommendations:

  • Public entities, which hold investment portfolios that support their core operational activities, should regularly assess how they can strengthen their skills and capabilities for governing their financial assets.
  • Public entities, with significant financial assets, should regularly assess how well they are managing and governing their financial portfolios and reporting to stakeholders (the report provides nine guidance questions for these entities to use in their assessment).
  • The Treasury should prepare a strategic perspective on, and vision for, holding financial assets in the public sector.

Further, the report concludes that, overall, all 14 sample entities had reasonably good structures and systems in place for managing and governing their assets, and the report includes specific data and findings on each entity. Those entities include: ACC; the Government Superannuation Fund; the New Zealand Superannuation Fund; Public Trust; Housing New Zealand Corporation; the New Zealand Debt Management Office; and Auckland Council.

A copy of the report can be found here.


A new direction for copper and fibre regulation

On 14 April Communications Minister, Hon Amy Adams, announced a number of policies regarding the future regulation of both fibre and copper services in New Zealand as part of the Government’s ongoing review of the Telecommunications Act 2001. These policies include:

  • from 2020, ultra-fast broadband (UFB) and copper pricing regulation will move to a building blocks model (BBM), similar to that currently used to regulate other utilities including electricity, following the expiry of the current pricing contracts for fibre and copper at the end of 2019;
  • the current fibre unbundling requirements will be retained from 2020;
  • the Government is considering ways to better support competition in the market for mobile services; and
  • there will be no changes to the regulation of broadcasting services.

Usually, under a BBM, a ‘revenue cap’ is set for the regulated entity, which is designed to allow the service provider to recover its costs while preventing the creation of monopoly profits and where the revenue cap is set with reference to various ‘building blocks’. It is thought that this new regulatory framework will be more appropriate than the Total Service Long Run Incremental Cost methodology currently used, given the ongoing roll out of UFB and New Zealand's fixed line telecommunications networks.

While the methodology for determining prices under the BBM has not yet been established (and was not included in the announcement), the Government has indicated that it is investigating how to protect consumers during the transition to the new regime from sudden price increases for ‘anchor products’, such as basic phone and broadband services.

The announcement is the most recent development in the Government’s review and reform of the telecommunications sector and follows the release of the Regulating Communications for the Future discussion document last year. The review is part of the wider Digital Convergence work programme which aims to update regulation in light of rapid technological change.

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment will be staging consultations on the design and implementation issues later in the year, in the form of an options paper.

The Minister's announcement is available here, while a fact sheet on the review can be viewed here.


Reserve Bank to review Insurance (Prudential Supervision) Act

The Reserve Bank is set to commence a two-year review of the Insurance (Prudential Supervision) Act 2010 (IPSA) later this year. 

Announcing the review earlier this month, the Reserve Bank's Head of Prudential Supervision, Toby Fiennes, said that, despite the review, “We believe that IPSA has had a positive effect on the soundness of the insurance industry in New Zealand and that the legislation has generally worked well.” However, with over five years having passed since the IPSA scheme was first introduced, Mr Fiennes explained that it was time to review whether “the legislation and associated regulations are working as intended.” Specifically, since its enactment in 2010, there have been a number of developments that significantly affect the insurance sector, such as the Canterbury earthquakes and increasing public awareness of the importance of a regulated insurance industry, which will both be taken into account during the review.

The IPSA will be reviewed with reference to its purposes, which are to promote the maintenance of a sound and efficient insurance sector, and promote public confidence in the insurance sector. The objectives of the review are to assess IPSA’s performance to date to ensure that it provides a cost-effective supervisory regime promoting soundness and efficiency in the insurance sector. The review will also consider the consistency of the IPSA regime with international guidance and other relevant legislation.

The Reserve Bank intends to publish an issues paper later this year, after which it will seek feedback from the public and stakeholders. On the basis of that feedback, the Reserve Bank will prepare a report for Cabinet which will eventually lead to the publication of an options paper in 2017, setting out possible options for changes to the legislation. Any recommended changes agreed to by Cabinet would be introduced to Parliament in 2018 at the earliest. The Reserve Bank plans to keep stakeholders informed and actively seek engagement from the industry via newsletters, forums and seminars throughout the review period.

The Reserve Bank’s press release announcing the review can be read here. Terms of reference for the review can be found here.



Commerce Commission releases independent research regarding factors affecting competition in busines

The New Zealand Commerce Commission (Commission) released independent research conducted by UMR Research on 31 March that aims to provide greater insight into the factors affecting competition in the high value business segment of the mobile market.

Under the Telecommunications Act 2001, the Commission must monitor the performance and development of telecommunications markets. 

As part of the study, UMR Research surveyed businesses in New Zealand to identify potential barriers impeding competition for market share, including impediments to customers switching providers and perceptions of mobile provider quality such as service delivery.

UMR Research's final report, ‘Competition for Business Customers in the Mobile Industry: A Report for the Commerce Commission’ recorded that respondents believed the business mobile market was competitive compared to other industries, with the majority of surveyed businesses satisfied with their main mobile provider. Fewer than 15 per cent of surveyed businesses were actively looking to switch providers or would consider doing so when their contract was up. In addition, the research found that respondents, when selecting a mobile provider, consider that reliable coverage, good customer service and price were the most important factors.

Telecommunications Commissioner, Dr Stephen Gale, concludes that, “overall, the study does not suggest that there is any anti-competitive behaviour or structural, legal or systemic factors existing in the market that are inhibiting competition. Instead, most businesses appear to be sticking to their providers as they are largely satisfied with the service they receive.”

The full media release can be found here and a copy of the full UMR Research report can be viewed here.


Commerce Commission will not inquire into gas metering services

The Commission will not commence a Part 4 inquiry into gas metering services in New Zealand. In an announcement on 1 April, the Commission stated that while it remains concerned about the level of competition in the market for the supply of gas metering services, the likelihood of the benefits of regulation materially outweighing the costs, was not sufficient to justify an inquiry. 

The Commission decided to conduct a preliminary assessment as to whether to conduct an inquiry, following Vector’s clearance acquire the gas metering assets and business of Contact Energy’s natural gas metering business in April 2013. In clearing the merger, the Commission found that there appeared to be already limited competition between market participants in the North Island gas metering market, and that the state of competition, with and without the acquisition, would not be substantially different. As a result of these findings, the Commission decided to consider whether it should undertake an inquiry into gas metering services under Part 4 of the Commerce Act 1986, which provides for the regulation of the price and quality of goods or services in markets where there is little or no competition and little or no likelihood of a substantial increase in competition.

The Commission intends to continue to pay attention to the pricing of gas metering services in future and the full announcement can be found here.


Commerce Commission signs cooperation arrangement with Canadian Competition Bureau

The Chair of the New Zealand Commerce Commission (Commission), Dr Mark Berry, and the Commissioner of the Canadian Competition Bureau (CCB), Mr John Pecman, signed a mutual cooperation arrangement (Arrangement) on 12 April 2016 designed to enhance collaboration on cross-agency competition matters.

The Arrangement allows the Commission to share “compulsorily acquired information” with the CCB – including information not in the public domain, and information that was acquired by the Commission as a result of (or in relation to) the exercise by the Commission of any of its statutory information-gathering powers. Further, the Arrangement enables the Commission to provide investigative assistance to the CCB by exercising any of its statutory information-gathering powers. The Arrangement also enables the CCB to share confidential information it holds with the Commission.

For any information to be shared under the Arrangement, the requesting party must provide a written request to the other party stating that the information sought will, or is likely to, assist in the requesting party’s exercise of its powers or performance of its duties, and explaining why the information cannot be obtained more conveniently from another source. Under the Arrangement, the providing party may impose conditions on any information released, including, for example, relating to confidentiality, storage, copying or returning of the documents, and the payment of costs.

The Arrangement is the Commission’s second competition cooperation arrangement with the CCB after it signed a three-way arrangement with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) and the CCB in 2000. A similar bilateral arrangement with the ACCC was signed in 2013.

The Commerce Commission’s media release on the Agreement is available here and the full text of the Arrangement can be viewed here.


Review of foreign trusts disclosure rules announced

Finance Minister, Hon Bill English, and Revenue Minister, Hon Michael Woodhouse, have announced an independent review of the disclosure rules for foreign trusts operating in New Zealand (Review). The Review will examine whether the current disclosure rules and practices are in accordance with New Zealand’s international commitments and if practical improvements can be made to the disclosure regime.

The Review was prompted by the recent leak of the so-called “Panama Papers” from law firm Mossack Fonseca which show how shell corporations and trusts in overseas jurisdictions, including New Zealand, are used to conceal wealth and avoid tax payments. The Review will be lead by former PwC chairman and tax commentator John Shewan.

The current disclosure rules require that foreign trusts in New Zealand must be registered and keep certain financial and other records which can be requested by the Inland Revenue Department and shared with overseas tax authorities. However, foreign trusts do not pay tax on their overseas earnings, and trustees are not required to disclose anything about the assets, beneficiaries or settlors of the trust.

The Review will focus on New Zealand’s existing disclosure rules and practices (as they relate to foreign trusts), in the areas of record keeping, enforcement and exchange with foreign jurisdictions. Further, the Review will report on whether the existing rules, when considered alongside New Zealand’s, demonstrate the following:

  • commitment to the OECD action plan on base erosion and profit shifting (BEPS);
  • commitment to the Convention on Mutual Administrative Assistance in Tax Matters;
  • commitment to implementing the global standard for the automatic exchange of information (AEOI);
  • existing and planned bilateral tax treaty network (including tax information exchange agreements);
  • Anti-Money Laundering framework; and
  • other related regimes.

The review is to be completed by 30 June, when the Ministers will consider the report’s findings and whether reform of the disclosure rules is necessary. 

The Ministers’ full media release is here and the full terms of the review can be viewed here.


Independent Review of Intelligence and Security in New Zealand released

The report of the first independent review of Intelligence and Security in New Zealand, conducted by Hon Sir Michael Cullen and Dame Patsy Reddy, has been released and proposes removing unnecessary barriers to effective co-operation between the Government Communications Security Bureau (GAS) and the New Zealand Security Intelligence Service (Agencies). The review was initiated by 2013 amendments to the Intelligence and Security Committee Act 1996 which now require a review of the agencies, the legislation governing them, and their oversight legislation every five to seven years.

The central conclusion of the report is that there should be a single, integrated and comprehensive Act that lays out in plain English what the agencies’ purposes are, how their activities are authorised and how they are overseen. Dr Cullen commented that if permitted by the terms of reference of the review, they would have recommended a merger of the two agencies, and that the next review may come to that conclusion.

Another significant recommendation of the report was the removal of current restrictions on the GCSB intercepting New Zealanders’ private communications. Dr Cullen pointed to instances where the restrictions would be illogical, such as where the lives of New Zealanders are in danger overseas. Under proposed new legislation, the GCSB could carry out surveillance on New Zealanders for the purpose of protecting national security, with a warrant.

The perceived expansion of the powers afforded to the agencies is acknowledged in the report by a proposal to enhance the agencies’ oversight regime. It proposes a three-tiered approach to authorisation of the agencies’ activities, with higher levels of scrutiny for activity that is more intrusive or that targets New Zealanders. The highest level of authorisation would be a warrant approved by the Attorney-General and a judicial commissioner, and would be required for any activities that would otherwise be unlawful and are for the purpose of targeting a New Zealand citizen, permanent resident or organisation.

The report is now being considered by Parliament’s Security and Intelligence Committee. While the Committee functions in a similar way to a Select Committee of Parliament, its status and power is enhanced by its governing Act, which provides the Committee with a statutory role to examine a wide range of security and intelligence issues. The current Committee members are: the Prime Minister (chair); the Prime Minister’s two nominees (Jim Anderton and Dr Cullen); the Leader of the Opposition (Andrew Little); and the Leader of the Opposition's nominee (Rt Hon Winston Peters).

A copy of the full report can be accessed here.


New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme review 2015/16: consultation commences

Minister for Climate Change Issues, Hon Paula Bennett, has announced the release of two technical notes for consultation by the Ministry for the Environment: ‘the Forestry Technical Note’; and ‘the Operational Matters Technical Note’. Both notes have been released to support the consultation on ‘other matters’ as part of the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS) review 2015/16.

The Forestry Technical Note seeks feedback on the existing structure of forestry in the NZ ETS, and on ways that it could evolve to support the changing international and domestic contexts and help New Zealand to achieve meeting its future international targets. Feedback is sought from a range of stakeholders, including forestry participants, landowners, wood processors and manufacturers, and iwi with forestry interests.

The Operational Matters Technical Note seeks feedback on operational issues not included in the NZ ETS review discussion document, such as: compliance requirements; disclosure of NZ ETS information; tree weed exemption provisions under the Climate Change Response Act 2002; transfer of participation for post-1989 forestry; and the public’s access to information about the status of land under the NZ ETS. 

The Minister, commenting on the release of the two notes, stated that the NZ ETS is an essential tool to drive the changes that are required of New Zealanders regarding climate change. The second phase of the review is intended to ensure that the NZ ETS is fit for the purpose of helping New Zealand achieve its 2030 target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 30 per cent below 2005 levels.

For further information on the NZ ETS review, see here.


Privacy Commissioner 2014/15 annual review

The Justice and Electoral Committee has released its report ‘2014/15 Annual review of the Privacy Commissioner’ that addresses the performance and current operations of the Privacy Commissioner for the period.

Key findings of the report include:

  • Intelligence and Security: The Privacy Commissioner is working with the GCSB to develop a policy for personal information, and the Commissioner expects to provide final comments on the policy to the GCSB in the coming weeks. Section 13 of the Privacy Act 1993 empowers the Privacy Commissioner to consult with bodies concerned with the privacy of the individual, such as security agencies.
  • Oversight group: the Office initiated the oversight group in 2015 in response to the continued public interest and awareness of the activities of intelligence and surveillance agencies. The group consists of the Privacy Commissioner, the Ombudsman, the Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security, and the Auditor-General. The report states that the oversight group has extended their network internationally to include organisations in Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America.
  • Approved information sharing agreements (AISAs): AISAs are a mechanism introduced into the Privacy Act 1993 in 2013 for the purpose of allowing agencies to collaborate and share information. The report states that although the Office expected 30 new AISAs to be entered into by agencies, only three AISAs have been implemented (two of which Inland Revenue is a party to). The report notes that some agencies decided they could operate without any special legal authority, or that the process was too hard.

A copy of the full report can be found here.


Progress of legislation

New Bills

Ngatikahu ki Whangaroa Claims Settlement Bill
Type of Bill: Government
Member in Charge: Hon Christopher Finlayson
This Bill would give effect to the deed of settlement signed on 18 December 2015 by the Crown and Ngatikahu ki Whangaroa, and provide for the final settlement of historical Treaty of Waitangi claims to Ngatikahu ki Whangaroa. The Bill seeks to formally record a Crown apology to Ngatikahu ki Whangaroa and provide a range of cultural redress to the iwi, including the vesting of various properties (listed in clauses 62-76).

Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary Bill
Type of Bill: Government
Member in Charge: Hon Nick Smith
This Bill aims to establish a new marine protected area in New Zealand’s exclusive economic zone around the Kermadec Islands, the ‘Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary’, and to preserve it in its natural state. Clause 9 of the Bill would prohibit fishing, mining activity, disturbance of the seabed and removal of non-living material from the seabed or subsoil, dumping of waste or other matter (including from ships or aircraft), and the causing of vibrations (other than vibrations caused by the propulsion of a ship) in a manner that is likely to have an adverse effect on marine life in the Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary. An activity prohibited under clause 9 would also be considered unlawful fishing under the Fisheries Act 1996. The Bill does not capture any work or activity of the Crown that the Minister of Defence certifies is necessary for (amongst other things) reasons of national security, or an activity for the purposes of marine scientific research (authorised by the Environmental Protection Agency, in accordance with the proposed Act). The Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary would be part of a wider network of Pacific marine protected areas, including: the US Pacific Remote Islands Marine National Monument; and the Australian Coral Sea Commonwealth Marine Reserve.

Social Security Legislation Rewrite Bill
Type of Bill: Government
Member in Charge: Hon Anne Tolley
This Bill intends to repeal and replace the Social Security Act 1964 and the Social Welfare (Reciprocity Agreement, and New Zealand Artificial Limb Service) Act 1990 to update and improve the accessibility of the legislation. The Bill aims to clearly set out the existing requirements for eligibility, obligations, sanctions, and rights to review and appeal decisions, and how assistance is delivered. As the Social Security Act 1964 is over 50 years old, and has been subject to intense amendment, the Bill would also update the drafting style and language of the legislation. The Bill also proposes a small number of policy changes aimed at improving frontline practice, and aligning with modern service delivery.


Bills awaiting first reading

Consumer Guarantees (Removal of Unrelated Party Lender Responsibility) Amendment Bill
Customs and Excise (Prohibition of Imports Made by Slave Labour) Amendment Bill
Legislation Amendment Bill
Ngā Rohe Moana o Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Porou Bill
Ngāti Pūkenga Claims Settlement Bill
Ngatikahu ki Whangaroa Claims Settlement Bill
Public Works (Prohibition of Compulsory Acquisition of Māori Land) Amendment Bill
Remuneration Authority Amendment Bill
Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Exemption for RNZRSA Clubs from Special Licensing Requirements for Anzac Day) Amendment Bill
Social Security Legislation Rewrite Bill
Tauranga Moana Iwi Collective Redress and Ngā Hapū o Ngāti Ranginui Claims Settlement Bill


Bills before Select Committee

Submissions open

Bill

Select Committee

Closing date for Submissions (2016)

Geographical Indications (Wine and Spirits) Registration Amendment Bill

Primary Production

29 April

Kermadec Ocean Sanctuary Bill

Local Government and Environment

28 April

Land Transfer Bill

Government Administration

28 April

New Zealand Horticulture Export Authority Amendment Bill

Primary Production

13 May

Papawai and Kaikokirikiri Trusts Amendment Bill

Māori Affairs

14 April

Rangitāne o Manawatu Claims Settlement Bill

Māori Affairs

28 April

Royal New Zealand Foundation of the Blind Act Repeal Bill

Health

20 April

Substance Addiction (Compulsory Assessment and Treatment) Bill

Health

27 April

Taranaki Iwi Claims Settlement Bill

Māori Affairs

28 April

Te Atiawa Claims Settlement Bill

Māori Affairs

28 April

Wildlife (Powers) Amendment Bill

Local Government and Environment

12 May


Submissions closed

Bill

Select Committee

Report due (2016)

Agricultural Compounds and Veterinary Medicines Amendment Bill

Primary Production

15 April

Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill

Social Services

2 June

Building (Pools) Amendment Bill

Local Government and Environment

14 April

Canterbury Property Boundaries and Related Matters Bill

Local Government and Environment

3 May

Civil Defence Emergency Management Amendment Bill

Government Administration

9 August

Education Legislation Bill

Education and Science

8 June

Financial Assistance for Live Organ Donors Bill

Health

23 September

Keep Kiwibank Bill

Finance and Expenditure

14 April

Minimum Wage (Contractor Remuneration) Amendment Bill

Transport and Industrial Relations

29 April

Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill

Government Administration

14 April

Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill

Government Administration

Extended to 28 April

Patents (Trans-Tasman Patent Attorneys and Other Matters) Amendment Bill

Commerce

9 August

Public Collections and Solicitations (Disclosure of Payment) Bill

Social Services

12 August

Residential Tenancies Amendment Bill

Social Services

8 June

Resource Legislation Amendment Bill

Local Government and Environment

3 June

Shop Trading Hours Amendment Bill

Commerce

3 May

Statutes Amendment Bill

Government Administration

9 June

Bills awaiting second reading

Child Protection (Child Sex Offender Register) Bill (as reported by the Social Services Committee)
Electronic Monitoring of Offenders Legislation Bill
Evidence Amendment Bill
Health Practitioners (Replacement of Statutory References to Medical Practitioners) Bill
Māori Purposes Bill (as reported by the Māori Affairs Committee)
New Zealand Public Health and Disability (Southern DHB) Elections Bill (as reported by the Health Committee)
Ngāruahine Claims Settlement Bill (as reported by the Māori Affairs Committee)
Ngāti Hineuru Claims Settlement Bill
Land Transport (Admissibility of Evidential Breath Tests) Amendment Bill
Riccarton Racecourse Bill and Riccarton Racecourse Development Enabling Bill (as reported by the Local Government and Environment Committee)
Smoke-free Environments (Tobacco Plain Packaging) Amendment Bill
Social Security (Extension of Young Persons Services and Remedial Matters) Amendment Bill
Taxation (Income-sharing Tax Credit) Bill
Taxation (Transformation: First Phase Simplification and Other Measures) Bill (as reported by the Finance and Expenditure Committee)


Bills defeated

Environmental Protection Authority (Protection of Environment) Amendment Bill
Member in charge: Meka Whaitiri 
59 in favour: Labour 32; Green Party 14; New Zealand First 12; United Future 1.
62 against: National 59; Māori Party 2; ACT 1.


Bills awaiting third reading

Appropriation (2014/15 Confirmation and Validation) Bill
Building (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Bill
Christian Churches New Zealand Property Trust Board Empowering Bill
Commerce (Cartels and Other Matters) Amendment Bill
Coroners Amendment Bill
Drug and Alcohol Testing of Community-based Offenders, Bailees and Other Persons Legislation Bill (formerly the Drug and Alcohol Testing of Community-based Offenders and Bailees Legislation Bill)
Environment Canterbury (Transitional Governance Arrangements) Bill
Health (Protection) Amendment Bill
Human Rights Amendment Bill
Insolvency Practitioners Bill
Judicature Modernisation Bill
Local Government (Auckland Council) Amendment Bill (No 3)
Natural Health and Supplementary Products Bill (formerly the Natural Health Products Bill)
New Zealand Business Number Bill
Policing (Cost Recovery) Amendment Bill
Taxation (Residential Land Withholding Tax, GST on Online Services, and Student Loans) Bill
Te Pire mō Te Reo Māori / Māori Language Bill
Wellington Town Belt Bill


Acts awaiting assent

Greater Christchurch Regeneration Bill
Radio New Zealand Amendment Bill


Acts assented

Radiation Safety Act 2016
This Act repeals and replaces the Radiation Protection Act 1965 for the purpose of enhancing the legislative framework for radiation safety. Section 8 of the Act imposes a duty on every person who deals with a radiation source to ensure that people and the environment are protected now and in the future from the adverse effects of the radiation source by complying with the fundamental requirements set out in sections 9 – 12 of the Act. The Act also provides that, in general, a person is prohibited from: manufacturing, possessing or controlling a radiation source unless authorised under a ‘source licence’ (sections 17 – 20); using a radiation source unless authorised under a “use licence” (sections 21 – 23); and importing or exporting radioactive material unless ‘consent’ is granted by the Director for Radiation Safety (sections 24 – 25). The Director for Radiation, who is appointed by the Director-General under section 76 and must be an employee of the Ministry of Health, has various functions, duties and powers and the Act, including the appointment of enforcement officers who may enter and inspect any place (other than a private dwelling) to monitor compliance with the Act. The Act also renames the current Radiation Protection Advisory Council to the ‘Radiation Safety Advisory Council’. Section 98 of the Act, which amends the Terrorism Suppression Act 2002, came into force on 8 March 2016. The rest of the Act is due to commence in March 2017.

Weathertight Homes Resolution Services Amendment Act 2016
This Act amends the Weathertight Homes Resolution Services Act 2006 to clarify aspects of the leaky homes compensation system established under the principal Act. The Act: clarifies a Gazette notice entitled ‘Contribution Criteria: Financial Assistance Package’ published on 28 July 2011; provides that certain claims determined as ineligible on the basis of the meaning of the term ‘built’ in sections 14 to 18 of the principal Act are to be deemed to be ‘eligible’ claims; and widens the definition of ‘qualifying claimant’ in section 125B of the principal Act to include claimants that are actively progressing claims. Section 7 of the Act, which inserts subpart 8 into the principal Act in relation to the 2011 Gazette notice, is deemed to have come into force on 23 February 2015. The rest of the Act came into force on 15 March 2016.

Employment Relations Amendment Act 2016
Holidays Amendment Act 2016
Minimum Wage Amendment Act 2016
Parental Leave and Employment Protection Amendment Act 2016.
Wages Protection Amendment Act 2016
Formerly part of the Employment Standards Legislation Bill, these Acts each respectively make a number of technical amendments to their principal Acts for the purposes of improving the employment relations-employment standards legislative framework. In particular, the Acts:

  • Introduce the term ‘primary carer’ into the Parental Leave and Employment Protection Act 1987 to cover individuals who are entitled to parental leave and parental leave payment (if they meet the relevant tests). The new term covers biological mothers, their spouses / partners, and persons who take permanent primary responsibility for the care, development, and upbringing of a child who is under the age of six years. The amendment Act also implements the increase from 16 weeks to 18 weeks of paid parental leave.
  • Amend the Employment Relations Act 2000 to provide that an employee’s agreed hours of work must be specified in the employment agreement.
  • Amend the Minimum Wage Act 1983, Holidays Act 2003, Wages Protection Act 1983 and Employment Relations Act 2000 to strengthen minimum wage and holiday entitlements, including stronger enforcement mechanisms.

Legislative instruments

Chartered Professional Engineers of New Zealand Levy Regulations 2016
Civil Aviation (Offences) Amendment Regulations 2016
Eden Park Trust (Trust Deed Amendment) Order 2016
Education Amendment Act 2015 Commencement Order 2016
Education (Pastoral Care of International Students) Code of Practice 2016
Fisheries (High Seas Fishing Notifications: Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission) Amendment Notice 2016
Fisheries (Notification of Tangata Tiaki/Kaitiaki for Mātaitai Reserve at Te Kaio Bay) Notice 2016
Fisheries (Notification of Tangata Tiaki/Kaitiaki for Mātaitai Reserve at Port Levy (Potiriwi)/Koukourarata) Notice 2016
Fisheries (Total Allowable Catch, Total Allowable Commercial Catch, and Deemed Value Rates) Amendment Notice 2016
Health Entitlement Cards Amendment Regulations 2016
International Finance Agreements Amendment Act 2013 Commencement Order 2016
International Student Contract Dispute Resolution Scheme Rules 2016
Judicial Salaries, Allowances, and Superannuation (Court Martial Appeal Court and Court Martial) Determination 2016
Minimum Wage Order 2016
Product Safety Standards (Children’s Nightwear and Limited Daywear Having Reduced Fire Hazard) Regulations 2016
Public Finance (Ōtākaro Limited) Order 2016
Social Security (Childcare Assistance) Amendment Regulations 2016
Social Security (Effect of Absence of Beneficiary from New Zealand) Amendment Regulations 2016
Social Security (Exemptions under Section 105) Amendment Regulations 2016
Social Security (Expiry and Re-grant of Specified Benefits) Amendment Regulations 2016
Social Security (Rates of Benefits and Allowances) Order 2016
Social Security (Support for Children in Hardship – Transitional Subsidy) Regulations 2016
Student Allowances Amendment Regulations 2016
Veterans’ Support Amendment Regulations (No 2) 2016 
Vulnerable Children (Children’s Services) Order 2016


In the week ahead

What’s coming up in the House

When the House resumes on Tuesday 3 May after a two week recess, the Government will look to complete the Appropriation (2014/15 Confirmation and Validation) Bill, the third reading of the Building (Earthquake-prone Buildings) Amendment Bill, and make progress on a number of other bills on the Order Paper. Wednesday 4 May will be a Members’ Day.


What’s coming up in the House

The House resumed on Tuesday 29 March after a one week recess. The Government will look to progress the Environment Canterbury (Transitional Governance Arrangements) Bill, the Te Pire mō Te Reo Māori / Māori Language Bill and the Drug and Alcohol Testing of Community-based Offenders, Bailees, and Other Persons Legislation Bill.


In committee

Recent Committee meetings

Select Committees met over the last two weeks.

The Commerce Committee considered the Patents (Trans-Tasman Patent Attorneys and Other Matters) Amendment Bill.

The Finance and Expenditure Committee considered two reports from the Controller and Auditor-General, ‘Improving financial reporting in the public sector’, and ‘A review of public sector financial assets and how they are managed and governed’. The two reports are available here.

The Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee continued its international treaty examination of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement.

The Government Administration Committee considered the Civil Defence Emergency Management Amendment Bill and was briefed on the Zika Virus.

The Local Government and Environment Committee considered the Resource Legislation Amendment Bill.

The Social Services Committee considered the Births, Deaths, Marriages, and Relationships Registration (Preventing Name Change by Child Sex Offenders) Amendment Bill and was briefed on the review of the Social Workers Registration Act 2003 and the Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Authority’s plan for psycho-social recovery in Canterbury.

The Transport and Industrial Relations Committee completed its international treaty examinations of: the Cape Town Agreement of 2012 on the implementation of the provisions of the Torremolinos Protocol of 1993 relating to the Torremolinos International Convention for the Safety of Fishing Vessels, 1977; the International Convention on Standards of Training, Certification and Watchkeeping for Fishing Vessel Personnel, 1995; and Denouncing the Convention on Limitation of Liability for Maritime Claims, 1976.


Recent Committee meetings

Select Committees met over the last two weeks.

The Education and Science Committee considered the Education Legislation Bill.

The Foreign Affairs, Defence and Trade Committee continued its international treaty examination of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement.

The Government Administration Committee considered the Official Information (Parliamentary Under-Secretaries) Amendment Bill, the Parental Leave and Employment Protection (Six Months’ Paid Leave and Work Contact Hours) Amendment Bill, and the Statutes Amendment Bill.

The Local Government and Environment Committee heard from the Parliamentary Commissioner for the Environment on her 2015 report, ‘Preparing New Zealand for Rising Seas: Certainty and Uncertainty’. The report follows on from the Commissioner’s earlier 2014 report, ‘Changing climate and rising seas: Understanding the science’, which aimed to make the science of climate change, and specifically sea level rise, accessible and relevant for New Zealanders. A copy of the full 2015 report is available here.

The Māori Affairs Committee was briefed on the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement and how it affects Māori.

The Primary Production Committee considered a report of the Controller and Auditor-General, ‘Ministry for Primary Industries: Preparing for and responding to biosecurity incursions – follow-up audit’.


In trade

Tariff concessions

The following applications for tariff concessions have been made in the past two weeks:

Applicant

Proposed tariff concession

Tariff item

Closing date for objections (2016)

Advance Flooring Systems Limited

Tufted polyamide or polypropylene commercial grade floor covering, with a primary backing of non-woven polyester and a secondary backing of vinyl and a 2cm vinyl border.

5703.20.09

3 May

Cyclic Solutions Limited

MD31343FQ  “OTNYDRY”; 75% polyester face with 25% polyester bamboo charcoal inner; weight 140g/m²  – 10,000m².

6006.32.19

3 May

OMV New Zealand Limited

Anchor shackle, D-type, of a kind suitable for use with a 118mm GR.R4 studless mooring chain; having all of the following: eye bolt, nut and pin.

7326.90.09

3 May

S & T Stainless Limited

Viscoelastic polymer damping material, sandwiched between two layers of steel.

7308.90.90

3 May

Bydezign NZ Limited

Moulded polypropylene resin indoor/outdoor chairs and tables for commercial use and parts thereof.

9401.80.00
9401.90.19
9403.70.00
9403.90.00

10 May

Pipe Technologies Limited

Resin impregnated fibreglass laminate used in drainage pipes.

7019.90.29

10 May

Tariff concessions

There are currently no tariff concessions open for objections.


In consultation

New

Who

What

By when (2016)

Department of Conservation

New listing of the threatened status of New Zealand vascular plants.

31 July

Intention to grant a license to T & L Jago to run guided waka tours in the Abel Tasman Foreshore Scenic Reserve.

1 June

Electricity Authority

Assessment of real time pricing (RTP) options.

24 May

Environmental Protection Authority

Changes to Exirel insecticide application method to allow aerial application.

23 May

Financial Markets Authority

Exemption for small offers of cooperative shares.

6 May

Inland Revenue Department

Land Sale Rules: considering when there will be a “regular pattern” of acquiring and disposing of land, meaning the main home exemption cannot be used.

30 May

Ministry for Primary Industries

Proposed amendments to the importing requirements for Cucurbitaceae seeds for sewing.

10 May

Proposed Amendments to the halal export assurance system.

11 May

Application for exemption from rock lobster quota aggregation limits.

13 May

Consultation on proposed animal welfare regulations.

19 May

Proposed further temporary fishing closure at Wakatu Quay, Kaikoura.

23 May

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment

ACC regulated payments for treatment increase.

6 May

Discussion Document: Fee and levy options for WorkSafe New Zealand’s oversight of regulations for major hazard facilities.

6 May

Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Malaysia-NZ free trade deal.

13 May

Ministry of Transport

Driver licensing review.

2 June

New Zealand Transport Agency

Land Transport (Driver Licensing Rule) 1999: Driver Licensing Review.

2 June

PHARMAC

Proposal to list a range of sterilisation packaging products and associated consumables – supplied by Jackson Allison Medical & Surgical Ltd, Intermed Medical Ltd and 3M New Zealand.

29 April

Proposal to amend listing of olopatadine eye drops (Patanol).

6 May

Standards New Zealand – Joint Standards

Grid connection of energy systems via inverters Part 1: Installation requirements.

23 May

Safety in laboratories Part 3: Microbiology safety and containment aspects of work with microorganisms.

9 June

Scaffolding Part 2: Couplers and accessories – requirements for manufacturers and suppliers.

10 June

Gas appliances: general requirements.

15 June

Windows – Methods of test. Part 1: Test sequence, sampling, and test methods.

16 June

New

Who

What

By when (2016)

Department of Internal Affairs

Births Deaths and Marriages and Relationships Act 1955 proposal paper.

29 April

Department of Conservation

Draft conservation services programme annual plan 2016/17.

27 April

Notice of intention to dispose of conservation area – Heslerton Road, Dunsandel.

6 May

Electricity Authority

Consultation paper: Proposal to alter the way availability costs are allocated.

26 April

Inland Revenue Department

Commissioner’s practice for notifying taxpayers of a pending audit or investigation and advising them that one has begun.

22 April

Tax Administration Act 1994: Commissioner’s practice on the period for which a private or product ruling applies.

5 May

Ministry for Primary Industries

Proposed amendments to the importing requirements for capsicum seeds for growing.

6 April

Ministry for the Environment

Nominations for the Green Ribbon Awards.  The Awards recognise outstanding contributions of individuals, organisations, businesses and communities in protecting and enhancing New Zealand’s environment. The Awards are open to all individuals and organisations in New Zealand.

15 April

Operational Matters Technical Note – part of the second stage of the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme Review 2015/16.

30 April

Forestry Technical Note – part of the second stage of the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme Review 2015/16.

30 April

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment

Discussion document: information disclosure regulations for third-party fundraisers making request for charitable purposes.

22 April

Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Report on the environmental impact of a proposed runway in Antarctica.

23 May

New Zealand Transport Agency

Draft State highway public engagement guidelines.

29 April

Reserve Bank

Crisis Management Powers for Systemically Important Financial Market Infrastructures (or SIFMIs).

20 May

Standards New Zealand – Joint Standards

Safety of laser products. Part 4: Laser guards.

25 April

Safety of laser products. Part 3: Guidance for laser displays and shows.

25 April

Mechanical properties of fasteners made of carbon steel and alloy steel. Part 2: Nuts with specified property classes – coarse thread and fine pitch thread.

27 April

Information and documentation – Management systems for recordkeeping – Guidelines for implementation.

11 May

Methods for sampling and analysis of ambient air Method 10.1: Determination of particulate matter – Deposited matter – Gravimetric method.

11 May

Oriented PVC (PVC-O) pipes for pressure applications.

13 May

High-strength steel bolt assemblies comprising bolts, nuts and washers for structural engineering:

  • Part 1: Technical requirements; and
  • Part 2: Validation testing.

18 May

Guide to the painting of buildings.

18 May

Amendment 1 to AS/NZS 2566.1:1998. Buried flexible pipelines. Part 1: Structural design.

20 May

Structural steelwork – Fabrication and erection.

25 May

WorkSafe New Zealand

Major Hazard Facilities good practice guidelines.

8 April

Proposed amendment to Code of Practice for Fire or Explosion in Underground Mines and Tunnels.

15 April

Draft ACOP for Emergency Readiness in Mining and Tunnelling Operations.

15 April

Current

Who

What

By when (2016)

Department of Internal Affairs

Births Deaths and Marriages and Relationships Act 1955 proposal paper.

29 April

Department of Conservation

Notice of intention to dispose of conservation area – Heslerton Road, Dunsandel.

6 May

New listings and changes to the threatened status of New Zealand vascular plant taxa.

31 July

Wellington Conservation Management Strategy.

ongoing

East Coast/Hawke’s Bay Conservation Management Strategy.

ongoing

Food Standards Australia and New Zealand

Proposed approach to revising the infant formula requirements in the Food Standards Code.

17 May

Inland Revenue Department

Tax Administration Act 1994: Commissioner’s practice on the period for which a private or product ruling applies.

5 May

Ministry for the Environment

Review of the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme.

30 April

Operational Matters Technical Note – part of the second stage of the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme Review 2015/16.

30 April

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment

Exposure draft of the Incorporated Societies Bill.

30 June

Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade

Report on the environmental impact of a proposed runway in Antarctica.

23 May

International climate change negotiations and issues.

ongoing

Ministry of Transport

Imagining New Zealand’s Transport Future discussion document.

ongoing

New Zealand Transport Agency

Draft State Highway public engagement guidelines.

29 April

Productivity Commission

New models of tertiary education issues paper.

4 May

Reserve Bank

Crisis Management Powers for Systemically Important Financial Market Infrastructures (or SIFMIs).

20 May

Standards New Zealand – Joint Standards

Revision of AS/NZS 4765:2007 – Modified PVC pipes for pressure applications.

28 April

Amendment 3 to AS/NZS 4417.2:2012 Regulatory compliance mark for electrical and electronic equipment.
Part 2: Specific requirements for particular regulatory applications.

2 May

Information and documentation – Management systems for recordkeeping: Guidelines for implementation.

11 May

Methods for sampling and analysis of ambient air Method 10.1: Determination of particulate matter – Deposited matter – Gravimetric method.

11 May

Oriented PVC (PVC-O) pipes for pressure applications.

13 May

High-strength steel bolt assemblies comprising bolts, nuts and washers for structural engineering:

  • Part 1: Technical requirements; and
  • Part 2: Validation testing.

18 May

Guide to the painting of buildings.

18 May

Amendment 1 to AS/NZS 2566.1:1998. Buried flexible pipelines. Part 1: Structural design.

20 May

Structural steelwork – Fabrication and erection.

25 May


This publication is intended only to provide a summary of the subject covered. It does not purport to be comprehensive or to provide legal advice. No person should act in reliance on any statement contained in this publication without first obtaining specific professional advice. If you require any advice or further information on the subject matter of this newsletter, please contact the partner/solicitor in the firm who normally advises you, or alternatively contact one of the partners listed below.

Current

Who

What

By when (2016)

Department of Internal Affairs

Proposed changes to the Gambling Act 2003 Class 4 Gambling Equipment Minimum Standard.

11 April

Department of Conservation

Intention to grant a 30 year concession to Epic Cycle Adventures to establish a glamping facility at Piropiro in the Pureora Forest Park.

14 April

Proposal to dispose part of conservation land in the Tirohanga Dunes Conservation Area.

20 April

New listings and changes to the threatened status of New Zealand sharks, rays, and skates.

20 April

New listings and changes to the threatened status of New Zealand vascular plant taxa.

31 July

Wellington Conservation Management Strategy.

ongoing

East Coast/Hawke’s Bay Conservation Management Strategy.

ongoing

Electricity Authority

Proposal to introduce a default agreement for distribution services.

19 April

Environmental Protection Authority

Application to import for release Elatus Plus fungicide intended for to control a number of fungal diseases affecting wheat crops.

21 April

Food Standards Australia and New Zealand

Proposed approach to revising the infant formula requirements in the Food Standards Code.

17 May

Inland Revenue

Whether and when section 6 CB of the Income Tax Act 2007 will apply to land acquired with a purpose or intention of disposal.

7 April

Whether the proceeds from the sale of gold bullion investments will necessarily be income.

7 April

Ministry for Primary Industries

Proposed direction and work programme for dealing with antimicrobial resistance.

8 April

Draft import health standards for egg products.

22 April

Next Steps for Freshwater, consultation document on freshwater management.

22 April

Ministry for the Environment

Next Steps for Freshwater, consultation document on freshwater management.

22 April

Review of the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme.

30 April

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment

Exposure draft of the Incorporated Societies Bill.

30 June

Ministry of Transport

Imagining New Zealand’s Transport Future discussion document.

ongoing

Productivity Commission

New models of tertiary education issues paper.

4 May

Standards New Zealand – Joint Standards

Revision of AS/NZS 60079.2009 Explosive Atmospheres:
Part 14: Electrical installations design, selection, erection and initial inspection; and
Part 17: Electrical installations inspection and maintenance.

12 April

Electrical equipment for coal mines – Introduction, inspection and maintenance. Part 3: Gas detecting and monitoring equipment.

12 April

Revision of AS/NZS 4765:2007 – Modified PVC pipes for pressure applications.

28 April

Amendment 3 to AS/NZS 4417.2:2012 Regulatory compliance mark for electrical and electronic equipment:
Part 2: Specific requirements for particular regulatory applications.

2 May


This publication is intended only to provide a summary of the subject covered. It does not purport to be comprehensive or to provide legal advice. No person should act in reliance on any statement contained in this publication without first obtaining specific professional advice. If you require any advice or further information on the subject matter of this newsletter, please contact the partner/solicitor in the firm who normally advises you, or alternatively contact one of the partners listed below.

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